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Desexing & Microchipping

DESEXING

On 6 July 2016 the Dog and Cat Management Amendment (Miscellaneous) Bill 2015 was passed in Parliament.

The amended Dog and Cat Management Act includes the requirement for all new generations of dogs and cats to be desexed.

Registered dog and cat breeders are exempt from the desexing provision.

The age at which cats will be required to be desexed and when this provision will commence will be included in the Regulations.

There will also be a phase in period for the new provisions.

The Dog and Cat Management Board supports the desexing of all companion cats.

Why should you desex your cat?

Desexing offers many benefits for you and your cat.

It can reduce your cats desire to roam to find a mate and defend its territory. In turn this can help to reduce nuisance noise such as caterwauling, inappropriate spraying indoors and on other people’s houses and property and fighting with other cats which can lead to injuries and expensive vet bills!

By having your cat desexed you are reducing the risk of it getting Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) which can be transmitted through bite wounds and scratches from infected cats.

If you’re going to let your cat roam off your property it is important to have your cat vaccinated against FIV and FeLV as well as desexed.

Desexing your cat, if it goes outside, can help to control the number of unwanted kittens born which can add to the stray and feral populations.

Desexing has also been shown to reduce the development of certain types of reproductive cancers in cats.

Download the Cat desexing Info sheet

 

MICROCHIPPING

On 6 July 2016 the Dog and Cat Management Amendment (Miscellaneous) Bill 2015 was passed in Parliament.

The amended Dog and Cat Management Act includes the requirement for all dogs and cats over a certain age to be microchipped

The Regulations will include the information about when these provisions need to be undertaken, the age at which dogs and cats will need to be microchipped and more details about exemptions etc.

The Regulations will go out for public consultation later this year.

 There will also be a phase in period for the new provisions.

 

The Dog and Cat Management Board supports the mandatory microchipping of companion cats.

Microchipping is the most effective form of permanent identification. It encourages owner and breeder accountability and assists the recovery your cat, should it become lost.

It is important that you remember to update your cats microchip details if you move house or change contact details.

Microchipping is a means of electronically identifying animals through the insertion of a grain-of-rice sized microchip into the back of the neck by a trained practitioner.  Data relating to the owner is entered into one of the five microchip registry databases in use in Australia.  The microchip has a unique number which can be read by a special electronic reader.

Download the Cats and Microchips Info Sheet

 

 

 

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